Posts Tagged ‘charter’

The U.S. Constitution Explained!

December 14, 2011

Part 1

Intro & The Preamble

By Gary Hardee

Why attempt to explain something that changes from day-to-day or year over year? Seems rather difficult and is temporarily correct at best!  When, for instance, does the word “car” mean one thing one year and something else in another. Advancements and improvements are made as knowledge, technology, manufacturing processes and consumer preferences change. But a car is still a car, isn’t it? Let’s try “apple”.  Not the computer but the fruit. It really never changes and cannot be confused with a banana.

The wonderful thing about the US Constitution is that it is fixed and determined. Absolute, firm and precise! At the same time, its authors provided for ways to change it but under a very strict and precise process. This if used wisely, is a good thing too! But it is not arbitrary or random nor subject to interpretations different from its words and intent.

Limits and predictability are things of virtue and reliance; things upon which we need worry little about. We understand and appreciate anything that serves us well. But when someone twists a washing machine into a lawnmower it would be the height of idiocy to expect it to wash our clothes any longer and cannot be viewed as a washing machine.

The Constitution of the United States has a design and a purpose. What is that purpose? It is to promote the general welfare! Do you doubt that? Have you ever asked yourself: What is a Preamble? Here is the definition followed by the Preamble of the US Constitution itself.

Preamble: “1. a preliminary or introductory statement, esp. attached to a statute or constitution setting forth its purpose(s)”.

The Preamble of the U S Constitution

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

There are six goals of the Constitution. Each of the goals are noble and support the best interests of the general welfare of the people of these United States. It is very important to note the word “general” as opposed to “specific” or ‘targeted”.  It would be totally illogical to say you are for the general welfare of a people and at the same time allow for the specific welfare of one over another.

One thing is for sure; government is force. There are two types of force; justified and unjustified. Any use of force, by a government or individual, needs justification to be considered ethical and moral. The only justification in the use of force by government must be in agreement with the Preamble.

  1. To improve upon the Articles of Confederation. (n/a)
  2. Establish Justice
  3. Insure domestic Tranquility
  4. Provide for the Common Defense
  5. Promote the General Welfare
  6. Secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity

As they clearly said; it is for these reasons and purposes that it is ordained and established. Is there any remaining doubt about the founders’ intent? Is it proper to take any clause, statement or paragraph, contained within its text, to mean something that is damaging to these stated goals? Is it not also equally logical to conclude that if we abide and adhere to the specific terms within the Constitution itself, that the goals in the preamble will be best attained?

To allow for necessary changes to expand and enhance these goals the founders included the process and provisions to amend the text.  Is it then proper to adopt amendments that hurt or diminish the goals laid out in the Preamble?

Amendments have come and gone. Old amendments revoked or modified while entire new ones have been added. If the voting citizens understand why it is important to stay true to the Constitution, our elected officials would as well and we would once again reap the Blessings of Liberty.

Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: