Just Principles and the Discussion of Issues


By Gary Hardee

It is impossible to argue that government has not grown larger and more comprehensive in its cost and control over people and businesses. Anyone who has even a modicum of historical knowledge must at least admit that. Debates can be had all day long about why, its purported justifications and whether this growth contributes to the general welfare of its citizens.

News and commentary abound on this subject and with the advent of the internet, the “global human community” with its disparate knowledge serves as the greatest opportunity for mankind to share and converse on the pros and cons of the smallest minutia of government action or inaction, policies or laws.

While emotional, logical and even ugly at times, it should not stop one from participation in these discussions. Failure to participate and learn along the way leaves the outcome to others, as popular opinions on issues are worked out on this grand internet stage.

History has clearly shown also that a majority of humans do not participate in this exercise, but that may be changing as we begin to examine more openly  the connections between our challenges to live in peace and prosper as free human beings on this awesome planet and the always shifting and increasing government controls and costs.

As with any discussion over command and control of our lives and society, some fundamental agreements must be arrived at and serve as the guiding foundation. Failure to agree on the most basic of human principles also ends any possible further agreements wherein we seek to improve the general welfare of all.

With that in mind, the first principle we should agree on is: “You don’t own any part of me and I don’t own any part of you”.

The second principle we should agree on is: “I cannot force my will on you and you cannot force your will on me”.

The third principle we should agree on is: “Each individual is free to make their own choices in life, with or without the advice or permission of any other”.

The fourth principle we should agree on is: “Each individual is free to use their time in any manner they wish to achieve or live according to their own goals and standards”.

The fifth principle we should agree on is: “No human being has the power to compel another through force to be deprived of their time, labor, production, or any other real or imagined skill or byproduct thereof, that was obtained of free will during honest and ethical agreements, contracts, or commerce.”

The last one for now we should agree on is: “These principles will henceforth be referred to as “Just Principles” as they acknowledge the inherent freedoms each human has for their general welfare and therefore society as a whole and that any “laws” or governmental systems that may be considered for implementation must not violate in whole or in part any of these Just Principles and any such additional agreements should have as their direct object the protection, expansion and enhancement of these just principles without compromise.

While you might think of some others on your own, the main point is that we can now begin to look at the larger issues that are debated or that plague our world and the various societies and cultures that have been organized or practiced. This would necessarily include religious doctrine, philosophy, political systems, economics, education, reproduction, health and medical services, drugs, drug usage, the drug industry, corporatism, government-private partnerships and their operations and efficacy and any other issue wherein a person’s Just Principles are involved.

I look forward to a healthy and adult conversation on this subject and welcome your comments and suggestions below.

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